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Iran breaches nuclear deal


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Iran breaches nuclear deal


CGTN
July 2019

Iran has breached the 2015 nuclear deal by increasing its uranium enrichment from 3.67 percent to 4.5 percent. How will the European partners in the deal react? Can the deal be saved? Watch

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Digging in for a long fight, China isn’t about to say ‘uncle’ in the trade war Trump started


Digging in for a long fight, China isn’t about to say ‘uncle’ in the trade war Trump started In the upcoming G20 summit, China might lay into Trump, leaving him to "stew."

Digging in for a long fight, China isn’t about to say ‘uncle’ in the trade war Trump started


Digging in for a long fight, China isn’t about to say ‘uncle’ in the trade war Trump started In the upcoming G20 summit, China might lay into Trump, leaving him to "stew."

ThinkProgress
June 2019

With President Donald Trump prepared to impose another round of tariffs on Chinese imports, the country’s Foreign Ministry spokesman said it is willing to “fight to the end.”

“China does not want to fight a trade war, but we are not afraid of fighting a trade war,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said on Tuesday. “If the United States only wants to escalate trade frictions, we will resolutely respond and fight to the end.”

But what does “the end” even look like, after almost a year of a mix of tough-talk, diplomatic gestures, and, ultimately, harsh tariffs? Read more →

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What former officials on the National Security Council really think of John Bolton


What former officials on the National Security Council really think of John Bolton
Is the dynamic between President Trump and John Bolton normal?

What former officials on the National Security Council really think of John Bolton


What former officials on the National Security Council really think of John Bolton
Is the dynamic between President Trump and John Bolton normal?

ThinkProgress
May 2019

President Donald Trump had just said he did not want to go to war with Iran. Yet there was National Security Adviser John Bolton on Wednesday, ratcheting up his campaign against Iran during a trip to the United Arab Emirates. 

It seemed to be a classic case of cognitive dissonance — or perhaps a tug of war — over what could culminate in a real war in the tinderbox that is the Middle East. 

Trump’s third national security adviser (not counting an interim appointment), Bolton has in many ways put himself on public display in a way his predecessors did not, apparently unafraid to contradict the president on overseas trips and on Sunday news shows. In fact, Bolton’s face is so ubiquitous that he is known by his bushy moustache. Read more →

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Here is what war with Iran would look like


A war with Iran would take all of the troops, and require a draft President Trump said war will mean the "official end of Iran." But what would that take?

Here is what war with Iran would look like


A war with Iran would take all of the troops, and require a draft President Trump said war will mean the "official end of Iran." But what would that take?

ThinkProrgress
May 2019

Between tweets about migrants, the economy, and Democrats who are running for president, President Donald Trump on Sunday spared one tweet on the rising tensions between the United States and Iran.

“If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran. Never threaten the United States again!” he said. Read more →

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Here’s why Trump’s upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un is more likely to ‘go wrong than right’


Here’s why Trump’s upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un is more likely to ‘go wrong than right’

Forget hopes for a step-by-step approach with North Korea. U.S. will push for "very big bites."

Here’s why Trump’s upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un is more likely to ‘go wrong than right’


Here’s why Trump’s upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un is more likely to ‘go wrong than right’

Forget hopes for a step-by-step approach with North Korea. U.S. will push for "very big bites."

ThinkProgress
February 2019

If all goes as planned, President Donald Trump is set to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Hanoi, Vietnam on February 27 and 28 to, once again, discuss Pyongyang’s ballistic and nuclear weapons programs. And until then, Trump administration senior officials are trying to temper expectations.

In a call with reporters on Thursday, State Department officials could not share if they knew how North Korea would define “complete denuclearization.” In fact, one official said, “I don’t know if North Korea has made the choice yet to denuclearize.”

“Nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to,” said one of the officials, making it clear that no agreement may come from next week’s summit at all. Read more →

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Discussing rising tensions between the US and Iran


Discussing rising tensions between the US and Iran


CGTN America
October 2018

CGTN's Elaine Reyes speaks to D. Parvaz about the contentious relationship between the U.S. and Iran. Watch →

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Refugees fled to Greece for safety. They arrived at a living hell.


Refugees fled to Greece for safety. They arrived at a living hell.

Thousands of asylum seekers continue to arrive in Greece. Many of them are living in horrific conditions unimaginable in the European Union.

Refugees fled to Greece for safety. They arrived at a living hell.


Refugees fled to Greece for safety. They arrived at a living hell.

Thousands of asylum seekers continue to arrive in Greece. Many of them are living in horrific conditions unimaginable in the European Union.

ThinkProgress
March 2018

LESBOS, GREECE – Roohina sits in a room the size of a minivan with her daughter, Hosna, who is one and a half years old. Only the room isn’t so much a room as an indoor tent: The back wall is the only actual wall in their new home in the Moria refugee camp on the island. Blankets create a division between their space and the space where other families live in in the container housing. Another blanket functions as a door.

Roohina, who had a job at a U.N. agency in Kabul, has been living in Moria with Hosna and her husband, who she did not name and was not there at the time, for six days. The family decided to leave after his place of employment, Roshan, a telecommunication company, was among the businesses hit with a massive suicide attack in the capital’s diplomatic district in May. The attack was one of the deadliest in Kabul in years. Read more →

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Journalists allege threat of drone execution by US


Journalists allege threat of drone execution by US

Fearing assassination, Al Jazeera's Ahmad Zaidan and independent journalist Bilal Abdul Kareem file US legal complaint.

Journalists allege threat of drone execution by US


Journalists allege threat of drone execution by US

Fearing assassination, Al Jazeera's Ahmad Zaidan and independent journalist Bilal Abdul Kareem file US legal complaint.

Al Jazeera
April 2017

WASHINGTON, DC — Two journalists who say they have been targeted by the United States have filed a complaint against the American government, accusing it of putting them on a "kill list" and demanding to be taken off it.

The complaint was filed in the US District Court of the District of Columbia on Thursday on behalf of Ahmad Muaffaq Zaidan - a dual Pakistani-Syrian citizen who works for Al Jazeera and Bilal Abdul Kareem, an American, who has occasionally contributed to Al Jazeera and other media organisations. Read more →

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A hard winter: Afghan refugees return from Pakistan


A hard winter: Afghan refugees return from Pakistan
Two million more refugees are expected to return to a country mired in violence and braced for a bitter winter.

A hard winter: Afghan refugees return from Pakistan


A hard winter: Afghan refugees return from Pakistan
Two million more refugees are expected to return to a country mired in violence and braced for a bitter winter.

Al Jazeera
November 2016

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN — Caught in the middle of political tensions between Pakistan and Afghanistan are some two million Afghan refugees - registered and unregistered - who now face the option of either returning voluntarily or being deported from Pakistan.

And it couldn't happen at a worse time.

Winter in Afghanistan can be bitterly cold. The country is also experiencing a spike in violence, with increased attacks from the Taliban and Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) fighters, leading to peak levels of civilian casualties and internal displacement as people flee the fighting.  Read more →

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'Massive crisis' as 1.5m expected to flee Iraq's Mosul


'Massive crisis' as 1.5m expected to flee Iraq's Mosul

Number of displaced Iraqis in Kurdish region about increase within a month with the battle to retake Mosul set for mid-October.

'Massive crisis' as 1.5m expected to flee Iraq's Mosul


'Massive crisis' as 1.5m expected to flee Iraq's Mosul

Number of displaced Iraqis in Kurdish region about increase within a month with the battle to retake Mosul set for mid-October.

Al Jazeera
September 2016

DIBAGA CAMP,  IRAQ — In a stifling hot office with more flies than oxygen, Rzgar Abed does not hesitate when asked about the biggest challenge in managing the camp for Iraq's internally displaced people (IDPs).

"Space ... we're at 31,000 and that is our capacity. Thirty-one thousand," said Abed, who works for the Barzani Charity Foundation, whicg oversees a number of camps, populated by Iraqis displaced people fleeing fighters belonging to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) group in the Kurdish region.

That number is set to increase rapidly. Read more →

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Selling American Girls


Selling American Girls

Until recently, the victims were the ones being arrested

Selling American Girls


Selling American Girls

Until recently, the victims were the ones being arrested

Al Jazeera America
April 2015

Part 1: The Streets

LOS ANGELES, CA — On a cool, quiet Thursday night, crimes of all types unfurl on South Figueroa Street.

This is one of the main tracks for prostitution in Los Angeles, a strip where sex can be purchased from teenage girls on almost any given corner, where pimps, some of them gang affiliated, carefully guard their turf and property.

At about 200 blocks, most of them rough, the Fig, as it’s called, can hide a lot. In April it was hiding a 16-year-old named Stacey, missing since December.

She contacted a cousin on Facebook earlier that month, using someone else’s phone. She was with a pimp, she said. Then a big break: She called her mother from a blocked number, saying she didn’t know where she was and that she was scared. Read more →

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Can Japan revive its nuclear ghost towns?


Can Japan revive its nuclear ghost towns?
The instability of the Fukushima Daiichi plant continues to keep evacuees away from the disaster zone.

Can Japan revive its nuclear ghost towns?


Can Japan revive its nuclear ghost towns?
The instability of the Fukushima Daiichi plant continues to keep evacuees away from the disaster zone.

Al Jazeera
March 2014

NIHONMATSU, JAPAN   It's from a distance that Naoki Kobayashi tries to manage the reformation of his town Namie, which sits empty 10km away from the leaking nuclear plant that has wrought chaos on the lives of those in its radioactive reach.

In the relocated town office in Nihonmatsu, roughly 66km west of Namie, Kobayashi and his colleagues are wrestling with a major dilemma: How do you rebuild a town when you're not sure anyone - especially the young - even wants to go back?

At least that's the upshot from questionnaires sent to former residents.

Of the 60 percent who responded, about 30 percent said they don't plan to return to Namie, and another 30 percent indicated they're not sure they'll ever go back.

"We had 21,000 people in Namie, but it's impossible to rebuild for 21,000 … It's mostly the younger people who don't want to come back, and the main reason is fear of radiation," said Kobayashi, an administrative officer for Namie's revitalisation and recovery department. Read more →

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New Libyan media challenge: Covering first ever post-Gaddafi electionsage


New Libyan media challenge: Covering first ever post-Gaddafi electionsage


Al Jazeera — Listening Post
July 2012 

When Libyans vote in the country's first free elections in almost five decades, will they have had the benefit of a free and independent media to help them make an informed decision? Watch here →

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Smell of death lingers in Cairo's Iman mosque


Smell of death lingers in Cairo's Iman mosque
Hundreds of bodies line floors of makeshift morgue, some of them charred and impossible to identify.

Smell of death lingers in Cairo's Iman mosque


Smell of death lingers in Cairo's Iman mosque
Hundreds of bodies line floors of makeshift morgue, some of them charred and impossible to identify.

Al Jazeera
August 2013

CAIRO, EGYPT — One day after Cairo police cleared two sit-ins held in support of deposed President Mohamed Morsi, the capital city was slow to wake.

Hours after the state-of-emergency curfew was lifted, traffic and signs of life began to appear by late morning on Thursday.

But in some quarters, life was not going back to normal after at least 525 people were killed in the clearings in Cairo and ensuing clashes here and across the country.

In Giza, hundreds of Morsi supporters set fire to the local government offices, prompting the government to authorise the use of live ammunition on anyone attacking state buildings.

And in the al-Iman mosque in Nasr City, the neighbourhood where a massive, 47-day vigil was held at the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, hundreds of bodies from Wednesday’s violence still lined floors of the makeshift morgue.

Wrapped in shrouds and kept cool with blocks of ice, most of the bodies bore gunshot wounds, but a number were charred, making them hard to identify for family members. Read more →

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Dorothy Parvaz: Inside Syria's secret prisons


Dorothy Parvaz: Inside Syria's secret prisons
'We could clearly hear the interrogator pummelling his fists into his subject,' writes our correspondent.

Dorothy Parvaz: Inside Syria's secret prisons


Dorothy Parvaz: Inside Syria's secret prisons
'We could clearly hear the interrogator pummelling his fists into his subject,' writes our correspondent.

Al Jazeera
May 2011

DAMASCUS, SYRIA — I was standing in two fist-sized pools of smeared, sticky blood, trying to sort out why there were seven angry Syrians yelling at me. Only one of them - who I came to know as Mr Shut Up during my three days in a detention center, where so many Syrians 'disappeared' are being kept - spoke English.

Watching them searching my bags, and observing the set of handcuffs hanging from the bunk bed wedged behind the desk in the middle of the room, I guessed that I was being arrested - or, at the very least, processed for detention.

"Why are you doing this?" I asked.

"Shut up! SHUT UP!" said Mr Shut Up.  Read more →

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An expatriate rediscovers her homeland -- Iran


An expatriate rediscovers her homeland -- Iran Farsi is the first language in which I learned to read. Iran defines the food I crave, my sense of humor, my last name.

An expatriate rediscovers her homeland -- Iran


An expatriate rediscovers her homeland -- Iran Farsi is the first language in which I learned to read. Iran defines the food I crave, my sense of humor, my last name.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer
November 2006

My friends and colleagues keep asking me if I'm scared. They look worried when they tell me I should be careful.

"Aren't you afraid they'll do something to you?"

By "they," my friends mean the Islamic Republic of Iran, which is where I'm going, having been away for more than two decades.

The concern is that I'm an Iranian citizen who is working as a journalist in the U.S.

"They might think you're a spy. What if they arrest you?"

Good question. I'm certainly not a spy, but I do look sketchy on paper. Read more →